Sid on Skiing

A recent letter I received from Aunt Irene includes Uncle Sid weighing in on the subject of skiing. This is back to one of the “originals;” it just doesn’t get better than this! Quoting Sid:

“First of all I will explain the short wood barrel staves: they were used only for jumping. One time Garven came home and informed us he had turned somersault. Well, he was informed never to go alone again, maybe not to somersault either. Garven had made a special jump for this plan.

We had two jumps on our place, one east of the school and one in the apple orchard. Our neighbors to the east (Stendahls) built a scaffle with the use of dynamite to break up the rock. They had tournaments, but I understand they set it too far back so skiers lost too much speed before they got to the jump. Later there was a forest fire and it burned.

In 1935 Odell and I walked on skis to Whitehall for a tournament. I had chicken pox, so I took two aspirins. I got “Record Breaker” as a 12-year-old and Odell got “Longest Standing Jump.” We had to walk home in the daylight so we couldn’t stay for the banquet. The same day Bennie had driven our only car to Westby to ski. He always placed in the “B” class. On the way home, Bennie stopped at Gilbert Paulson’s gas station in Whitehall where he was told, “Your brothers took the prizes.” He woke us up to tell us.

Knut Amble (the jeweler) formed a youth ski club where the swimming pool is now [located] in Whitehall. This was for the youth to practice and then move on to the Lund hill. I completed a ride down the Lund jump and then [was] asked to accompany members to Cameron, Wisconsin, where I also rode the Cameron jump.” 

Don’t you have the sense that skiing was a big deal among the Borresons? After this fourth post on the subject, I think I’ve mentioned six of the eight brothers – and I’m sure more remains to be said – but later. Hope you’ve enjoyed this as much as I have.

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